Track User and Computer Sessions on Windows Server.

You can use Computer Management to track all connections to shared resources on a Windows Server 2008 R2 system. Whenever a user or computer connects to a shared resource, Windows Server 2008 R2 lists a connection in the Sessions node.

To view connections to shared resources, type net session at a command prompt or follow these steps:
1. In Computer Management, connect to the computer on which you created the shared resource.
2. In the console tree, expand System Tools, expand Shared Folders, and then select Sessions. You can now view connections to shares for users and computers.

The columns for the Sessions node provide the following important information about user and computer connections:
User The names of users or computers connected to shared resources. Computer names are shown with a $ suffix to differentiate them from users.
Computer The name of the computer being used.
Type The type of network connection being used.
# Open Files The number of files the user is actively working with. For more detailed information, access the Open Files node.
Connected Time The time that has elapsed since the connection was established.
Idle Time The time that has elapsed since the connection was last used.
Guest Whether the user is logged on as a guest.

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Network Troubleshooting Tools in Windows Operating System

Windows contains an assortment of utilities you can use to diagnose, monitor, and repair network connections. Here’s an overview of the key tools you’ll find in Windows Operating System and what they’re used for.

Get MAC Address (Getmac.exe)
Discovers the Media Access Control (MAC) address, and lists associated network protocols for all network cards in a computer, either locally or across a network.

Hostname (Hostname.exe)
Displays the host name of the current computer.

IP Configuration Utility (Ipconfig.exe)
Displays all current TCP/IP network configuration values, and refreshes DHCP and DNS settings.

Name Server Lookup (Nslookup.exe)
Displays information about Domain Name System records for specific IP addresses and/or host names so that you can troubleshoot DNS problems.

Net services commands (Net.exe)
Performs a broad range of network tasks; type net with no parameters to see a full list of available command-line options.

Netstat (Netstat.exe)
Displays active TCP connections, ports on which the computer is listening, Ethernet statistics, the IP routing table, and IPv4/IPv6 statistics.

Network Command Shell (Netsh.exe)
Displays or modifies the network configuration of a local or remote computer that is currently running; this command-line scripting utility has a huge number of options, which are fully detailed in Help.

PathPing (Pathping.exe)
Combines functions of Traceroute and Ping to identify problems at a router or network link.

TCP/IP NetBIOS Information (Nbtstat.exe)
Displays statistics for NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NetBT) protocol, NetBIOS name tables for both the local computer and remote computers, and the NetBIOS name cache.

TCP/IP Ping (Ping.exe)
Verifies IP-level connectivity to another internet address by sending ICMP packets and measuring response time in milliseconds.

TCP/IP Route (Route.exe)
Displays and modifies entries in the local IP routing table.

TCP/IP Traceroute (Tracert.exe)
Determines the path to an internet address and lists the time required to reach each hop; useful for troubleshooting connectivity problems on specific network segments.

Black screen when I connect to my Windows server via RDP

Why do I get a black screen when I connect to my Windows server via RDP (Remote Desktop)?

This issue is a known Windows bug that occurs when the primary drive ( C: ) runs out of available free space. When this happens, Windows often overwrites control panel color settings for the desktop and login screen, resulting in the “blacked out” login screen and/or desktop.

When the login screen is black, you can often still access the normal Windows desktop, you just have to alt/tab through the various login screens:

When you first connect via RDP, there are two blanks you can tab through, the top one being the username (which should be Administrator,or, whatever you have set as your admin name), then, when you tab again, you will be in the password field. After entering the username and password, you should be able to Tab/Enter, and gain access to the system. If the system was just recently rebooted without warning, another screen (black) will pop up, asking why the server was rebooted. You can type anything here, and tab/enter again.

RAM for Microsoft Windows

Here’s a list of how much RAM the various Windows versions and editions support:

Windows NT 4.0: 4 GB
Windows 2000 Professional: 4 GB
Windows 2000 Standard Server: 4 GB
Windows 2000 Advanced Server: 8 GB
Windows 2000 Datacenter Server: 32 GB
Windows XP Professional: 4 GB
Windows Server 2003 Web Edition: 2 GB
Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition: 4 GB
Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition: 32 GB
Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition: 128 GB
Windows Vista: 4 GB
Windows Server 2008 Standard: 4 GB
Windows Server 2008 Enterprise: 64 GB
Windows Server 2008 Datacenter: 64 GB
Windows 7: 4 GB

Raise a call with MICROSOFT .

1. Call 800-936-3100, and provide your Access ID to the customer service representative who will create your support incident and route you to the appropriate support engineer to work on the issue immediately. The support line is open 24x7x365.

2. Logon to https://premier.microsoft.com and click on “Submit Incident” on the left pane

How to check if a Windows server is running Microsoft Cluster Server.

1. Login to the server.
2. Open the services Console (Start>Run>Services.msc)
3. Check for the existence of the service “Cluster Service”
4. If this service exists, the serevr is running a Microsoft Cluster Server.
5. Follow these steps to check the status of Cluster Node and Cluster Group.
o Open Command prompt and type “CLUSTER NODE /status” -> This command will list the status of the nodes in the cluster
o Open Command prompt and type “CLUSTER GROUP /status” -> This command will list the status of the cluster groups in the cluster

Event logs not generated on the server.

Try to reboot the server if that does not work follow the below mentioned steps
1. Right-click on %SystemRoot%\System32\winevt\logs and select Properties.
2. Select the Security tab.
3. Click Edit button and click the Add button in the permissions dialog box.
4. In Select users, computers, or Groups dialog box ensure that under object types Built in Security Principals and the location as local computer name is selected.
5. Enter the object name as “NT SERVICE\EventLog” without quotes. And click OK. This group should have full control on the folder.
6. Once EventLog group is added add the rest of the groups with above mentioned permissions.